Thursday, September 18, 2008

cinema

What is your favorite movie and Why?

Saturday, September 13, 2008

Questions? pd 2

How was Cinema Created?

In the 1860s, mechanisms for producing artificially created, two-dimensional images in motion were demonstrated with devices such as the zoetrope and the praxinoscope. These machines were outgrowths of simple optical devices (such as magic lanterns) and would display sequences of still pictures at sufficient speed for the images on the pictures to appear to be moving, a phenomenon called persistence of vision. Naturally the images needed to be carefully designed to achieve the desired effect, and the underlying principle became the basis for the development of film animation.

With the development of celluloid film for still photography, it became possible to directly capture objects in motion in real time. Early versions of the technology sometimes required a person to look into a viewing machine to see the pictures which were separate paper prints attached to a drum turned by a handcrank. The pictures were shown at a variable speed of about 5 to 10 pictures per second, depending on how rapidly the crank was turned. Some of these machines were coin operated. By the 1880s the development of the motion picture camera allowed the individual component images to be captured and stored on a single reel, and led quickly to the development of a motion picture projector to shine light through the processed and printed film and magnify these "moving picture shows" onto a screen for an entire audience. These reels, so exhibited, came to be known as "motion pictures". Early motion pictures were static shots that showed an event or action with no editing or other cinematic techniques.

Ignoring Dickson's early sound experiments (1894), commercial motion pictures were purely visual art through the late 19th century, but these innovative silent films had gained a hold on the public imagination. Around the turn of the twentieth century, films began developing a narrative structure by stringing scenes together to tell narratives. The scenes were later broken up into multiple shots of varying sizes and angles. Other techniques such as camera movement were realized as effective ways to portray a story on film. Rather than leave the audience in silence, theater owners would hire a pianist or organist or a full orchestra to play music fitting the mood of the film at any given moment. By the early 1920s, most films came with a prepared list of sheet music for this purpose, with complete film scores being composed for major productions.

The rise of European cinema was interrupted by the breakout of World War I while the film industry in United States flourished with the rise of Hollywood. However in the 1920s, European filmmakers such as Sergei Eisenstein, F. W. Murnau, and Fritz Lang, along with American innovator D. W. Griffith and the contributions of Charles Chaplin, Buster Keaton and others, continued to advance the medium. In the 1920s, new technology allowed filmmakers to attach to each film a soundtrack of speech, music and sound effects synchronized with the action on the screen. These sound films were initially distinguished by calling them "talking pictures", or talkies.

The next major step in the development of cinema was the introduction of so-called "natural" color. While the addition of sound quickly eclipsed silent film and theater musicians, color was adopted more gradually as methods evolved making it more practical and cost effective to produce "natural color" films. The public was relatively indifferent to color photography as opposed to black-and-white,[citation needed] but as color processes improved and became as affordable as black-and-white film, more and more movies were filmed in color after the end of World War II, as the industry in America came to view color as essential to attracting audiences in its competition with television, which remained a black-and-white medium until the mid-1960s. By the end of the 1960s, color had become the norm for film makers.

Since the decline of the studio system in the 1960s, the succeeding decades saw changes in the production and style of film. New Hollywood, French New Wave and the rise of film school educated independent filmmakers were all part of the changes the medium experienced in the latter half of the 20th century. Digital technology has been the driving force in change throughout the 1990s and into the 21st century.

What genre of movies is your favorite? I’d have to say Sci-Fi also known as science fiction.

What genre of movies is the worst? I will say it is Romance or chick flicks.

What do I expect in a movie? i expect the movie to always be better then it prequel.

How are movies abused? there abused by whats called pirating or illeagal downloading thru sites like warz.com and other sites like it.

Who is involved in making a cinema?

Costume artists the people who design the costumes for the actors.

Make-up artists the people who apply make-up or other features to a actors.

Art director a person who supervises other artists.

Animal supervisor a person who supervises the animals in a live action movie.

Screenplay artists the people who write the scripts for a movie.

Story board artists the people who write the plot or story of a movie.

Background artists the people who design the set for a movie.

Studio manager the person who owns the set .

Character designer the person who creates the characters.

Character color designers the people who color the characters.

Casting directors the people who instruct the actor and actresses in a movie.

Security the people who keep fans off the set.

Hair dressers the people who do the actor or actress's hair.

Wardrobe the clothes the actors or actresses wear in a movie.

Negative cutter the person who cuts out the negative parts of the movie.

Gaffer the person that controls the lights.

How does lighting affect the movies? Modern stage lighting is a flexible tool in the production of theatre, dance, opera and other performance arts. Several different types of stage lighting instruments are used in the pursuit of the various principles or goals of lighting Stage lighting has several functions, although to allow for artistic effect, no hard and fast rules can ever be applied. The functions of lighting include:

  • Illumination: The simple ability to see what is occurring on stage. Any lighting design will be ineffective if the audience has to strain to see the characters; unless this is the explicit intent.
  • Revelation of form: Altering the perception of shapes onstage, particularly three-dimensional stage elements.
  • Focus: Directing the audience's attention to an area of the stage or distracting them from another.
  • Mood: Setting the tone of a scene. Harsh red light has a totally different effect than soft lavender light.
  • Location and time of day: Establishing or altering position in time and space. Blues can suggest night time while orange and red can suggest a sunrise or sunset. Use of gobos to project sky scene, moon etc
  • Projection/stage elements: Lighting may be used to project scenery or to act as scenery onstage.
  • Plot: A lighting event may trigger or advance the action onstage.
  • Composition: Lighting may be used to show only the areas of the stage which the designer wants the audience to see, and to "paint a picture".